The ORS Int. is the official adjudicator of ocean rowing records for Guinness World Records

 


Corrections / statement  re ocean rowing records

 
 

“I welcome the current discussion about ocean rowing records. Following consultation with Kenneth Crutchlow at the Ocean Rowing Society International, I believe that the proposed solution of having two classes of ocean rowing boat is a great improvement over what has been the previous state of affairs. By having two classes it means that we as a sport welcome future innovation in boat design whilst still allowing those rowing in more traditional boat designs to compete for world records and recognition amongst boats of the same class.

I have discussed with Kenneth about formation of a committee [to be named before mid-April] to both try and agree on a set of rules which define whether a boat can be included in the Classic class. Also the committee would sit when approached by a prospective ocean rower seeking clarification on their design of ocean rowing boat before construction begins. I am extremely optimistic that by having a committee to define the classic class boats and to advise future ocean rowers on their boat designs that together we can move the sport forwards to the benefit of all.”

Chris Martin
Ocean rower

 

 

 


The Guinness World Record book will be printed as usual in May.
As adjudicators for ocean rowing records we need to get our data in before the end of March - beginning of April.

If any ocean rower feels he/she is eligible for a record please contact ORS asap on oceanrowing@btinternet.com
 

 


We have recently been asked to review crossing times of ocean rowboats that differ from the vast majority of ocean rowing boats.

Out of 513 departures of ocean rowing boats since 1896, 494 can be described as classic, which are mono-hulls and allow for rear cabin to accommodate a 6.00 feet tall man or woman to sit up-right; 10 are  "open class", built according to rowers’ specifications.

The common denominator of all the "open class" boats is they have the possibility to be propelled faster than classic boats by getting an extra advantage of wind.


“JJ”
       Andrew Brown, Solo, Atlantic E to W December 5 2011 – January 14th 2012
       Crossing time -
40 days 9 hours 41 minutes

On a study of the photos of the boat it is clear that the design is significantly different from the majority of other designs and it has more of an area that could/would take advantage of the wind.

Click on images below to view larger pictures

   

 The source of pictures: http://www.andrew.rowtheatlantic.com/

It means that no classic boat would be expected to beat this crossing time and therefore can be considered as being at a disadvantage before rowing a stroke. This takes away the whole idea of competing for breaking an existing record, which – to make it fair - should be based on equal possibilities and chances for all challengers.

Hence forth there will be the following categories for ocean rowing records:

1.The fastest crossing of an ocean in a classic ocean rowing boat
(The fastest Solo, Double, Four, Six and Team)

2.The fastest crossing of an ocean in an open class ocean rowing boat

(The fastest open class Solo, Double etc.), which in its turn will be divided into mono-hulls and multi-hulls.

We believe this division will enable future record seekers to compete on equal basis (in classic ocean rowing boats) and/or give almost unlimited freedom to come up with new boat designs to those who would prefer to go in an open class category.

So the following ocean rowboats go under the category of open class:

1. Atlantic Endeavour
2. Celtic Crossing   
3. Ville de Dinard / Lady Bird / Somewhere
4. Lun                     
5.
Hornette              
6. ORCA                   
7. Flying Carrot         
8. Insure & Go / JJ     
9.
Hallin Marine          
10. Big Blue              

No Ocean Name Surname Country Boat Name Start Day Finish day Days at Sea Departure

Arrival

Boat's specification
1 Atlantic E to W (team) Roy Finlay UK Atlantic Endeavour November 1 1998 November 16 1998 16 days Puerto Mogan (Gran Canaria)

--- (Incomplete) Abandoned row in Cape Verde

     High cabin
crew of 15
2 Atlantic W to E (double) Roy Finlay UK Celtic Crossing July 28 2000 August 24 2000 26 days St. Johns, Newfoundland (Canada) (Incomplete) Towed back by Canadian Coastguard

Trimaran, a multihulled boat consisting of a main hull and two smaller outrigger hulls

Colleen Cronin USA
3 Atlantic E to W (solo) Emmanuel Coindre France Ville de Dinard April 15 2001 June 11 2001 57days
4h30min
Puerto de Mogan, 
Gran Canaria (Canary Islands)
Guadeloupe

low cabin, but with a protruding frame for self-righting

4 Atlantic W to E (solo) Nenad  Belic USA LUN May 11 2001 Sept 30 2001 142 day Stage Harbour, Chatam, Cape Cod, Mass lost at sea one whole cabin, allowing to stand inside
5 Atlantic W to E (Solo) Emmanuel  Coindre France Lady Bird July 29 2002 October 25 2002 87 days
13h 59 m
Chatham, Cape Cod,
Mass. (USA)
I. d'Ouessant, France low cabin, but with a protruding frame for self-righting
6 Atlantic W to E (Solo) Emanuel Coindre France Lady Bird July 26 2003 July 28 2003 1 day 23h 41min Chatham, Cape Cod,
Mass. (USA)
incomplete. Airlifted   by coast guard helicopter low cabin, but with a protruding frame for self-righting
7 Pacific+Atlantic W to E (Solo) Jim Shekhdar GB Hornette October 16 2003 00:40GMT October 16 2003 19:00GMT 0 days 18h
20min
Bluff, New Zealand returned for repairs High oversized cabin, allowing to stand inside
8 Atlantic E to W (solo)   Emmanuel Coindre France Lady Bird January 4 2004 10:06GMT January 5 2004 1 day 12h San Sebastian,
La Gomera, Spain
 stopped over at El Hierro, due to bad weather low cabin, but with a protruding frame for self-righting
January 7 2004 10:06GMT February 19 2004 01:32GMT 42days 14h 32 min Restinga Del Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain Guadeloupe
9 Atlantic W to East Emmanuel Coindre France Lady Bird July 9 2004  16:36GMT September 10 2004 62 days 19hours
 48 min
Chatham, Cape Cod, USA Meridian of I.d'Ouessant, France low cabin, but with a protruding frame for self-righting

10 

Pacific W to E (solo)

Emmanuel

Coindre

France

Somewhere

June 24 2005

October 31 2005

129d 17h 22min

Choshi, Japan

Coos Bay, Ore. USA

low cabin, but with a protruding frame for self-righting

 11

Atlantic E to W (four)

 

Denis

Richardson

USA

ORCA

December 15 2007 13:05GMT

January 20 2008 14:14GMT

factual - 36 days 1h  9min, recalculated with
penalty - 49 days

Puerto Mogan, Gran Canaria, Spain

Port St Charles, Barbados

trimaran, a multihulled boat consisting of a main hull and two smaller outrigger hulls
12

Chris

Cuddihy

13

Ronnie

Desiderio

14

Roy

Finlay

 15

Southern Ocean W to E (solo)

Oliver

Hicks

UK

Flying Carrot

Jan 23 2009

Apr 28 2009

95 days

Fisher's Point of Recherche Bay, Tasmania

Stewart Island/Rakiura, NZ

high oversized cabin

16

Atlantic E to W
 (solo)

Charlie

Pitcher

GB

Insure & Go

January 4 2010

Feb 25 2010

52d 6h 47min
unconventional boat

San Sebastian,
La Gomera, Spain

Antigua

high oversized cabin
17

Atlantic E to W
(six)

David

Hosking

GB


Hallin Marine

January 6 2011 20:30GMT

February 7 2011 20:01GMT

31d 23h 31min
(RS - 32 days 12h 12min)average overall speed - 3.84 m/h
 Fastest multihull

San Miguel Marina,  Tenerife, Spain

PSC, Barbados

Trimaran, a multihulled boat consisting of a main hull and two outrigger hulls

 Chris Covey
Paddy Thomas
 Naomi Hoogesteger
 Justin Johanneson
Jack Stonehouse
18

Atlantic E to W
(sixteen)

Angela

Madsen

USA

Big Blue

January 15 2011 19:25GMT

March 4th 2011 13:25GMT

47d 18h

Tarfaya, Morocco

PSC, Barbados

catamaran, a multihulled boat consisting of two hulls joined with a deck with a cabin in the middle, elevated above sea level

David

Davlianidze

Georgia

Ernst 

Fiby

Austria

Ryan

Worth

USA

Elizabeth

Koenig

Aleksandra

Klimas-Mikalauskas

Louise

Graff

Steve

Roedde

Canada

Nigel

Roedde

Dylan

White

Zach

Scher

Charles

Wilkins

Sylvain

Croteau

Tom

Butscher

Canada/
Switzerland

Margaret

Bowling

Australia

 Liam

Flynn

GB

19

Atlantic E-W
(solo)

Andrew

Brown

GB

JJ

December 5  2011

January 14 2012

40 days 9h 41 min
Fastest Solo

San Sebastian, La Gomera
 

PSC, Barbados

high oversized cabin

                       

under construction

 


We have recently received information regarding an ocean rowboat that has claimed a record, which prompted us to reconsider their record in order to maintain the integrity of ocean rowing records.

It is ORCA, Team of Four, Atlantic E to W, December 15 2007 – January 20 2008

We received an email from a person, who wishes to remain anonymous,
with pictures and a letter from a crew member of Orca as follows:

”Here are the pictures. Showing the oars used as a mast.
Twine was used from the top of the oars to the pontoons. Then towels were attached to the twin top and bottom creating a sail. And as per the captains orders we were told to cut this down immediately if anyone was to see us. This system was in place from approximately Jan 1st on.

Take nothing away from the other crew members who continued to row hard. However I personally do not want to be part of a world record knowing this had happened.
Regardless I'm still proud of what we all accomplished”

During the row in 2007-08  we accepted request of ORCA captain that he himself would give us daily positions update because he could not afford sat tracking system onboard. Therefore the communication with ORCA was provided by sat phone and was regular until Day 14 of the row (December 29 2007) after then it stopped. On January 2nd there was a message from a passing by ship that forwarded us - at the request of ORCA captain - information that sat phone on ORCA failed to work.

See http://www.oceanrowing.com/ORCA/dist.htm

The row did happen and a crossing was accomplished and it was the first multihull  ocean rowing boat that completed a crossing.

We have calculated the average miles accomplished presuming without oars standing upright and the ‘sailing system’ during the first week of the row and used this as an average for the time  to the finish (60 miles a day),
which gives us
49 days for the crossing instead of factual 36 days 1 hour 09 min.
 


Click on images below to view larger pictures